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First-time, or New Patients
Financial / Insurance Questions
General Physical Therapy Questions
Questions About Post-PT


First-time, or New Patients
What can I expect on my first visit?
Unlike many other clinics in the area, our therapists provide treatment on the same day as the evaluation. Here's what you can expect for your first visit:

  • We ask that you arrive for your appointment with your completed New Patient forms, which you can download here. If you do not have your paperwork or it is not completed, please arrive 15-20 minutes before your scheduled appointment. Arriving late, or not having your paperwork ready can cut into the amount of time the therapist can spend with you, or your appointment may need to be rescheduled.
  • Give the receptionist the prescription/referral for physical therapy from your doctor, your insurance card and a Photo ID. We will need to make a copy your insurance card and a photo ID for your file. (We require photo ID for compliance with recent government regulations under the "Red Flag Rule" by the FTC to protect against identity theft).
  • To start your evaluation, be prepared to sit and talk with the therapist about:
  • Your medical history and any relevant illnesses or complications, any medications you are taking or tests that have been performed that may effect your therapy; Your current problem(s)/complaints, including the onset timeframe of your injury, date of surgery, etc. and what your pain is like; Be sure to tell the therapist if your injury or problem effects your daily activities, participation in a specific sport or hobbies etc; and let the therapist know any goals you have with starting physical therapy.
  • During the evaluation, the therapist will need to perform some hands-on tests and may also take measurements for Range of Motion (ROM) - including Passive Range of Motion (PROM) which is when the therapist moves the joint, and Active Range of Motion (AROM) which is when you are moving the joint on your own. The therapist will also use tests to check your level of strength. The therapist may also use some soft tissue mobilizations to check for tenderness, edema (or swelling) or inflammation associated with your injury/problem.
  • After your complete examination, the therapist will discuss with you the plan for your treatment. This plan takes into consideration your input regarding your history and goals, the information and special tests performed, and the therapists assessment along with the written orders from your physician for physical therapy. Together you will determine the course of action. The therapist will then put your information together in a written evaluation which is given to your referring physician.

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What do I need to bring to my first visit?
For your first appointment, please bring your physical therapy prescription from your referring physician, your completed paperwork, your insurance card and payment information, your photo ID (we require photo ID for compliance with recent government regulations under the "Red Flag Rule" by the FTC to protect against identity theft), and any test results or diagnostic imaging you may have (i.e. X-rays, MRI reports, etc.). If you are using Workers Compensation insurance, please bring your physical therapy prescription, claim number, date of injury, information about the employer at the time of injury and your adjuster's contact information. If litigation is involved, please bring your attorney’s information. If you are covered by auto insurance, please have your claim number, date of injury, adjuster's information. If litigation is involved with a lien, please bring your attorney’s information.

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What should I wear for physical therapy?
Please wear comfortable or loose fitting clothing to therapy since the therapist will need access to the area we will be evaluating and treating. For upper extremity injuries, we provide gowns for you to wear, or you are welcome to wear a tank top. If you have a lower extremity injury or problem, it is best to wear shorts, or loose pants that easily pull up to the mid/upper thigh area.

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Can I fill out the paperwork in advance so I don't have to arrive early for my evaluation?
Absolutely. We have several ways to get your paperwork to you quickly. Our paperwork is available for download in PDF format:click here to download your paperwork now. If you are unable to download the paperwork, just call our office at 916-772-2909 to request the paperwork be faxed, emailed or snail-mailed to you. If you are having surgery, we ask that you please fill out the pain profile and “what you're experiencing now” sections of the paperwork AFTER the surgery.

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How long is each visit?
Your first visit for the evaluation will last about an hour, not including time for paperwork. As therapy progresses, our therapists will typically have a patient in the clinic for an hour, or up to an hour and a half, depending on what is being done and what is required to meet your therapeutic goals.

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What does the therapist do in a treatment?
Our physical therapist are Manual Therapy specialists, which means they have a hands-on approach to treatment. Although soft tissue mobilization (or massage) is commonly used, there are many other techniques or interventions the therapists use.

  • Exercise / Stretching
  • Estim (electrical stimulation) / hot and cold packs / Cryotherapy

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Will I be treated on my first visit/during the evaluation?
Unlike many other clinics, our therapists provide treatment on the same day as the evaluation. We believe that your first visit is a vital opportunity to get the healing process started and get you on your way to recovery faster. Why waste precious time when it comes to your health and well-being?

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How many visits will I need?
You may only need one visit or you may require months of care. The number of visits required depends upon several factors: your diagnosis and the number of visits prescribed by your physician, the severity of your impairments, your medical history, etc. You will be re-evaluated on a monthly basis and when you see your doctor, we will provide a progress report with our recent findings, recommendations and an updated plan of treatment.

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Who will I see at each visit?
You will be evaluated by one of our licensed and highly trained physical therapists and he will also treat you during subsequent visits. Unlike some clinics, where you see someone different each visit, we feel it is very important to develop a one-on-one relationship with you to maintain continuity of care and work closely with you to speed your recovery.

But ultimately, who you see each visit is up to you. We have two physical therapists on staff and they work closely together to provide the best possible care for our patients. If you're more comfortable with one therapist, no problem. However, you have to freedom to switch therapists to get another point of view on your injury or treatment, to simply to suit your schedule best, or just for a little variety. Your best interests are our priority, so our therapists don't “take offense” if you see the other therapist in the office for treatment. We are comfortable with whatever makes you more comfortable.

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Financial / Insurance Questions
Who pays for physical therapy?

Most health insurance plans cover physical therapy services, so check out our Accepted Insurance page for a summary of insurances we are contracted with. Be sure you talk to our receptionist so we can help you clarify your insurance coverage or call your insurance company as benefit plans can vary even within the same carrier.

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Do you accept my insurance?
Check our Accepted Insurance page for a list of many of the insurance companies we contract with.

We work closely with many doctors in the area who send their patients to us based on the results we provide. Because we produce results that typically meet or exceed these physicians’ expectations, many times they will send a patient to us even if we are not contracted with the patient’s insurance company.

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How does the billing process work?
As a courtesy to you, we will bill your insurance company. In order for us to bill your insurance company you must sign the Assignment of Benefits on your paperwork, which allows the insurance company to send us payments on your behalf. Copays are collected at the time services are rendered. To minimize receiving a bill at the end of the month, we will make a best estimate when a patient has a co-insurance and expect payment at the time services are rendered. This payment is applied to the patient's balance on the account and credited as dates are processed by the insurance company.

  1. When a patient is seen for treatment, the physical therapist documents the procedures and techniques performed as well as the time it took to complete those procedures and CPT codes (Common Procedure Terminology) codes are assigned per our documentation system.
  2. The CPT codes associated with the visit are input into our billing software under the patient's account and is sent electronically to a clearinghouse for verification and error checking. It is then sent electronically by the clearinghouse to the insurance company, or via paper claims if the carrier does not accept electronic claims.
  3. The insurance carrier processes this information and makes payments according to our contracted fee schedule or based on other methods of computation if we are not a network provider.
  4. An EOB (Explanation of Benefits) is created and sent to the patient. Our clinic also receives and EOB with a check for payment and a explanation of the balance that is due by the patient. If you receive payment from your insurance company for services performed by Rebound Rehab PT, please bring in the EOBs for us to copy and endorse the back of the check(s), making it payable to Rebound Rehab PT. Failure to submit these payments to our office in a timely manner could result in being charged the entire amount billed to your insurance company.
  5. If a balance remains, the patient is expected to make the payment on the balance. Patient statements are generated at the beginning of each month and the balance is due upon receipt.

Please remember that there are many factors in the billing process that can delay processing and payment on claims. While it is common for the process to be completed in 60 days or less, it is not uncommon for us to receive payment as long as 6 months after the treatment date.

When medical necessity is questioned or a review or pre-authorization is required, it is greatly appreciated for the patient to assist in any way possible to expedite the processing and payment of claims.

For Medicare patients, your insurance is billed in the same manner as above, except that in most cases, your claims are automatically forwarded by Medicare to your secondary or supplemental insurance carrier, if you have one. If we have a secondary insurance carrier on file for you, but Medicare did not forward the claims, we will bill the secondary insurance for you as a courtesy.

If you do not have secondary coverage, you will be charged the 20% of the remaining Medicare allowed charges after Medicare processes your claims and makes a payment on your behalf.

Please be aware that we bill electronically, so if Medicare has not forwarded your claims, you may receive an EOB from your secondary insurance company informing you (and us) that the Medicare ERA is required. Rest assured that we are aware this happens with electronic billing and will forward the necessary information for your claims to be processed by your secondary insurance carrier.

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What is the Medicare Therapy Cap and how does it affect my treatment?
The Medicare Therapy Cap is a dollar amount per year that each patient is limited to with outpatient physical therapy coverage. The beneficiary must first cover the Medicare deductible, and pay 20% co-insurance, and Medicare will cover the remaining 80%, up to $1920, for 2014. (Medicare's 80% is equal to $1536 and the patient’s 20% makes up the remainder, $384).

Once that cap is reached, should you agree with your therapist and doctor that it is medically necessary for you to continue treatment, our receptionist will ask you to sign an ABN (Advance Beneficiary Notice). The ABN notifies you that you will be financially responsible for these services. Your therapist can give you more information and discuss this with you at the time, as there are certain diagnoses that qualify for an exception to the cap.

Download the APTA's Medicare Cap FAQ (in PDF format). Or check out the APTA web site for more information.

If you are unhappy with the Medicare Therapy Cap regulations, click here to download a form letter to send to your Congressman to repeal the Medicare Therapy Cap (in MS Word format). There is also a letter written by the APTA that you can send your friends and family regarding this information.

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I was in a car accident. How does insurance work?
Typically, when you're involved in an auto accident, despite who was at fault, the primary insurance you use for your accident-related medical costs is your Med Pay (medical payments), which is optional medical coverage you carry on your own auto insurance policy. Usually there is a dollar amount to the maximum benefits the policy will pay. If you do not have medical coverage on your auto insurance, or your Med Pay is exhausted, your health insurance will be billed. Some Med Pay plans are set up to pay after your primary health insurance company is billed. Please be sure to talk to your insurance adjuster and find out which type of coverage you have. If your Med Pay is secondary to your health insurance, make sure your Med Pay has coordinated these benefits with your primary insurance carrier.

If you were involved in an accident that was not your fault and you have, or will be hiring an attorney, we will ask you and your attorney to sign a lien form, which delays payment to us in an agreement until you have settled your case.

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Do you have a cash rate?
For patients without health insurance or coverage for physical therapy, we do offer a reduced cash rate which we are proud to say has not changed since we opened our doors. We charge $100 for an evaluation and $80 for every visit thereafter. Our therapists understand the financial burden of not having coverage and work with your situation to ensure you are maximizing your involvement and meeting your therapeutic goals.

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Can you please explain some of these insurance terms?
Insurance coverage can be a confusing thing for people who don't deal with it everyday. We've compiled a list of commonly used "insurance jargon" to help you understand your coverage and benefits a little easier.

  • Adjuster - A representative of the insurer who seeks to determine the extent of the insurer's liability for loss when a claim is submitted.
  • Claim - A request by an individual (or his or her provider) to an individual's insurance company for the insurance company to pay for services obtained from a health care professional.
  • Co-Insurance - Co-insurance refers to money that an individual is required to pay for services, after a deductible has been paid. In some health care plans, co-insurance is often specified by a percentage. For example, the employee pays 20 percent toward the charges for a service and the employer or insurance company pays 80 percent.
  • Co-Payment / Copay - Co-payment is a predetermined (flat) fee that an individual pays for health care services, in addition to what the insurance covers. For example, some HMOs require a $10 "co-payment" for each office visit, regardless of the type or level of services provided during the visit. Co-payments are not usually specified by percentages.
  • Deductible - The amount an individual must pay for health care expenses before insurance (or a self-insured company) covers the costs. Often, insurance plans are based on yearly deductible amounts.
  • Dependents - Spouse and/or unmarried children (whether natural, adopted or step) of an insured.
  • Effective Date - The date your insurance is to actually begin. You are not covered until the policies effective date.
  • Exclusions - Medical services that are not covered by an individual's insurance policy.
  • Explanation of Benefits (EOB) - The insurance company's written explanation to a claim, showing what they paid and what the client must pay. Sometimes accompanied by a benefits check. Often, EOBs are sent to you and a copy to the provider.
  • Group Insurance - Coverage through an employer or other entity that covers all individuals in the group.
  • In-network - Providers or health care facilities which are part of a health plan's network of providers with which it has negotiated a discount. Insured individuals usually pay less when using an in-network provider, because those networks provide services at lower cost to the insurance companies with which they have contracts.
  • Individual Health Insurance - Health insurance coverage on an individual, not group, basis. The premium is usually higher for an individual health insurance plan than for a group policy, but you may not qualify for a group plan.
  • Limitations - A limit on the amount of benefits paid out for a particular covered expense, as disclosed on the Certificate of Insurance.
  • Maximum Dollar Limit - The maximum amount of money that an insurance company (or self-insured company) will pay for claims within a specific time period. Maximum dollar limits vary greatly. They may be based on or specified in terms of types of illnesses or types of services. Sometimes they are specified in terms of lifetime, sometimes for a year.
  • Out-of-Network - This phrase usually refers to physicians, hospitals or other health care providers who are considered non participants in an insurance plan (usually an HMO or PPO). Depending on an individual's health insurance plan, expenses incurred by services provided by out-of-plan health professionals may not be covered, or covered only in part by an individual's insurance company.
  • Out-Of-Pocket Maximum - A predetermined limited amount of money that an individual must pay out of their own savings, before an insurance company or (self-insured employer) will pay 100 percent for an individual's health care expenses.
  • Reasonable and Customary Fees - The average fee charged by a particular type of health care practitioner within a geographic area. The term is often used by medical plans as the amount of money they will approve for a specific test or procedure. If the fees are higher than the approved amount, the individual receiving the service is responsible for paying the difference. Sometimes, however, if an individual questions his or her physician about the fee, the provider will reduce the charge to the amount that the insurance company has defined as reasonable and customary.
  • Stop-loss - The dollar amount of claims filed for eligible expenses at which which point you've paid 100 percent of your out-of-pocket and the insurance begins to pay at 100%. Stop-loss is reached when an insured individual has paid the deductible and reached the out-of-pocket maximum amount of co-insurance.
  • Usual, Customary and Reasonable (UCR) or Covered Expenses - An amount customarily charged for covered or similar services and supplies which are medically necessary, recommended by a doctor, or required for treatment.

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General Physical Therapy Questions
What is a physical therapist?

Many people are confused about what physical therapists do. Some may have the impression that physical therapy is mostly performed in hospital setting following a major trauma or accident. Others may not know the difference between what a physical therapist does and what a massage therapist or Chiropractor does.

Physical therapists are licensed professionals and experts in musculoskeletal issues, meaning they deal with all the functions of the body related to muscle, nerve, joint and bone. They do not focus on on area, but look at the body as a whole and treat accordingly. Our physical therapists believe if you simply move a joint (joint mobilizations) without addressing the surrounding musculature and nerve structure around it, that joint has a pretty good chance of finding its way right back out of place.

Not only do physical therapists assist in healing injuries, but they can provide exercises and stretches to prevent injuries or even surgery. Patient education is a major part of a physical therapists job. Our therapists are skilled in ergonomics, athletic taping and training and are even able to cast custom footbed orthotics

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Why/how is physical therapy helpful?
Whether a patient suffers from a recent injury or accident or from chronic pain, many people don't know that physical therapists are well equipped to treat that pain and its source. Physical therapists are experts at treating musculoskeletal, neuro and movement or functional disorders, and can help correct the disorder and thus relieve the pain.

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Do I need a referral?
The state of California used to require a diagnosis from a doctor before a patient can see a therapist for treatment. However, now patients have direct access to physical therapy . Typically, our physical therapists can see you for an evaluation before you see your doctor. In either case, our therapist will compose an initial evaluation report that we will send to your doctor. If you are a private-pay (or cash) patient, no referral is required, but our therapists do encourage you to continue to inform and see your physician for your problem.

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Can I go to any physical therapy clinic with my doctor’s prescription/referral?
You have the right to choose the physical therapy clinic you go to for treatment.Your doctor’s office may suggest to you a clinic based on where you live, your insurance or your specific therapeutic needs, but ultimately it is your decision.There is now direct access to physical therapy in California. Ask us today what this means for you.

We work closely with many doctors in the area who send their patients to us based on the results we provide. Because we produce results that typically meet or exceed these physicians’ expectations, many times they will send a patient to us even if we are not contracted with the patient’s insurance company.

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Do I need to see my doctor before going to a physical therapist?
A physical therapist can see you for an evaluation before you see your doctor and will compose an initial evaluation report we will send to your doctor. If you are a private-pay (or cash) patient, no referral is required, but our therapists do encourage you to continue to inform and see your physician for your problem.

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Can physical therapists diagnose problems?
In California, physical therapists cannot make a medical diagnosis., but they remain an important provider of medical services. A physical therapist can perform an evaluation on a patient and send that information to the patient's physician in order to request a prescription and diagnosis. Physicians are typically the health care providers that will provide you with a medical diagnosis.

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Why should I go to a private practice physical therapist?
Our physical therapy practice is owned and operated by our therapists, which means they take to heart the quality of care each and every patient receives and they have the ability to spend more time with their patients. Our therapists also have a wide range of physicians they have a working relationship with, so they may also be able to suggest a specialist who might be best suited for your particular needs.

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Do physical therapists have specialties?
Physical therapists are well-trained and licensed in the state to practice. Below are different types of rehabilitation. Our therapists do several types of therapy listed below.

  • Orthopedic Physical Therapy - Orthopedic specialists see pre -and post-surgical patients, and treat various orthopedic problems such as osteoarthritis, neck and back pain, tendonitis and bursitis, rehabilitation from fractures, muscle sprains/strains and spasms, hip and knee problems, shoulder, elbow, and wrist injuries/problems.
  • Manual Therapy - The term Manual Therapy describes many hands-on techniques that are applied to movement dysfunctions: soft tissue, neural and joint mobilizations, craniosacral therapy, myofascial release, etc. Some people describe manual therapy as massage directed at specific soft tissue dysfunctions, joint mobilizations to restore joint range of motion and function and a variety of stretching, strengthening techniques directly applied by or with the therapist.
  • Sports Rehabilitation - Sports rehabilitation specialists help with prevention of sport injuries, as well as recovery and retraining the athlete after an injury. They are experts in using and establishing running, throwing, jumping, and sport-specific programs. Our therapist is a Certified Sports and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS).
  • Fitness and Wellness - Not only do physical therapists treat, but they are trained to establish fitness and wellness programs. If you need an exercise program, have problems with your weight, are concerned about preventing falls or ergonomic issues, our physical therapists can help.
  • Hand Therapy - Certified Hand Therapists have passed a hand therapy certification examination, although most physical therapists are well trained to treat hand and wrist conditions.
  • Balance, Dizziness, and Vertigo Rehabilitation - many suffer from dizziness or BPPV (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo). Some clinics specialize in the rehabilitation of patients with vertigo. Patient education, strengthening, safety awareness, posture and balance exercise, walking exercise, and special techniques that affect sensory and balance centers of the brain and limbs are all important components of a rehabilitation program.
  • Geriatric Physical Therapy - Most physical therapists will work with seniors but some will specialize in geriatric rehabilitation and will obtain additional education, pass a board examination, and become a GCS (Geriatric Certified Specialist).
  • Women's Health - Therapists who specialize in women's issues specialize in areas such as complications from pregnancy, pelvic pain and incontinence.
  • Industrial Rehabilitation - Industrial rehabilitation specialists help with those that have suffered on-the-job injuries.
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy - Pediatric Certified Specialists assist in the rehabilitation of children.
  • Aquatic Physical Therapy - Aquatic therapy takes advantage of the properties of water to assist with the rehabilitative process in a "low impact" manner.
  • Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation - Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Certified Specialists work with patients that have had heart attacks, bypass surgeries, angioplasty, breathing problems, emphysema, and other heart/lung related conditions.
  • Neurological, Spinal Cord Injury, and Traumatic Brain Injury Rehab - Neurological Certified Specialists work with patients that suffer from these conditions.
  • Amputee Rehabilitation - Physical therapists who specialize in the rehabilitation of amputees car for the injured limb, assist in functional and walking training, and training in the use of assistive devices (crutches, canes, prosthetic limbs, etc).
  • Wound Care - Therapists who specialize in the treatment and care of wounds remove unviable tissue (debridement), apply special dressings and prescription drugs/ointments, and use ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and aquatic modalities to assist in healing.
  • ECS (Clinical Electrophysiologic Certified Specialist) - A Clinical Electrophysiologic Certified Specialist performs electroneurophysiology examinations such as nerve conduction studies and electromyography.
  • Lymphedema Rehabilitation - Physical therapists who specialize in lymphedema treat painful swelling when the lymphatic system is damaged by using massage and bandaging techniques.
  • Osteoporosis Rehabilitation and Prevention - These physical therapists will work with your medical doctor and design a specialized weight-bearing and resistance training program for patients with Osteoporosis.

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Is physical therapy painful?
No pain, no gain? Sometimes physical therapy can be painful, even though the end goal is pain relief. Many times, patients with joint hypomobility (the joint doesn't move as much as it should) experience pain while the physical therapist is using techniques to regain the motion the joint that has lost. This occurs many times with patients who have had joint replacements or the painful condition, frozen shoulder. Our therapists realize that some of the techniques can be painful while being performed and want to be sure you communicate to them the intensity of your pain before, during and after treatment so they can help you reach your therapeutic goals.

Many times, exercises and stretching techniques will be taught by our therapists and staff to relieve pain, and assist in recovering range of motion, strength, and endurance.

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What if I experience pain after treatment?
Flare-ups are not unheard of and most commonly occur within the first few treatments. This most likely happens when muscles and joints that haven't been moving are manipulated by the therapist to return it to ideal function. If you have a flare-up (exacerbation) during or after your treatment is over, give us a call. We may suggest you come back to see your therapist, return to your doctor, or modify your exercise routine or daily activities.

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Do I get a massage in physical therapy?
Massage, or soft tissue mobilization, and deep tissue techniques may be a part of your treatment, but don't expect soothing music, dim lights and aromatherapy. Our therapists are trained in a variety of techniques that may help with your recovery. Massage is typically used for three reasons: to relieve pain, reduce swelling from an area and to relax tight muscles. Circulation is not increased with massage.

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What does “manual therapy” mean?
Manual therapy describes a variety of hands-on treatment techniques that are applied to movement dysfunctions. Some people describe manual therapy as massage directed at specific soft tissue dysfunctions, joint mobilizations to restore joint range of motion and function and a variety of stretching, strengthening techniques directly applied by or with the therapist.

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Do you talk with my doctor so he/she is aware of my progress?
You will be re-evaluated on a monthly basis, when your goals or therapeutic progress changes, or when your prescription is coming to an end. Please be sure to let us know when your next appointment is with your doctor, so we can provide a progress report with our recent findings, recommendations and an updated plan of treatment. We believe that communication between you, your therapist and your doctor is crucial in maintaining the correct path for treatment and to reach your therapeutic goals.

Medicare patients are required to have a progress report done every 30 days or 10 visits, whichever is sooner. Physical therapy is “certified” by the referring physician for 90 days or by the end date of the prescription, whichever is sooner. The referring physician must re-certify the patient’s continued therapy at that time.

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Post-Physical Therapy Questions
Do I need to do anything once I'm done with physical therapy?
Most of our patients will need to continue with home exercises, or a gym exercise program after treatment in the clinic is finished, and some will simply complete their treatment and return to normal daily activities. It is important to communicate goals to your therapist, so you can develop as post-therapy program that works for you.

For patients without access to a gym, we offer a monthly gym program. Please ask your therapist for details.

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What if my pain returns?
If you have a flare-up (exacerbation), or a return of pain after you are discharged from physical therapy, give us a call. We may suggest you come back to consult with your therapist, return to your doctor, or simply modify your exercise routine or daily activities.

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6526 Lonetree Blvd, Ste. 200 • Rocklin, CA 95765
tel. 916.772.2909 • fax 916.772.2989

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